Old Charlotte News Items from Local Newspapers

Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, June 1, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
April 22, 1876 -- SUDDEN DEATH.  On Friday last, 14th inst., Mr. John B. Gaulding died very suddenly at the residence of his son.  J.M. Gaulding near Clark's Ferry.  Mr. Gaulding was 82 years and one month old.  He had been upon the low grounds for a short time, and on returning sat down, calling for a glass of water, and in a few moments breathed his last.  He was formerly the owner of a plantation near Lunenburg Courthouse and on Saturday, his remains were conveyed to that place for interment.  He was one of the oldest and most esteemed citizens.
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April 15, 1876 -- HAMPDEN SYDNEY CENTENNIAL -- Rev. Dr. R.L. Dabney delivers the Baccalaureate sermon; Rev. Dr. Hoge is the Centennial orator; Hon. Blair Grigsby delivers the Historical oration; Rev. Dr. Muckland, of Maryland, addresses the Literary Societies and Judge Stevenson of North Carolina addresses the alumni.  The occasion will be one of rare interest and intellectual enjoyment.
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April 15, 1876 -- We understand that Mr. Daniel Grove of Ohio has purchased the farm formerly owned byMr. Emig, near Keysville, containing about 100 acres.
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April 15, 1876 -- A LITTLE OF ALL SORTS -- The splendid appearance of the grass lot in front of the residence of His Honor, Mayor Eggleston, excites much admiration.
The new mansion home of J.H. Priddy, Esq., at Keysville excites the admiration of all those who pass over the Danville road.
The uniform courtesy and geniality of Judge Dickenson secures for him the highest respect of the bar and esteem of all.
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April 29, 1876 -- CHURCH FESTIVAL.  The ladies of Antioch Church, located near Red Oak Grove propose to hold a Festival and Tableaux, for the benefit of the church, on Tuesday, May 11.  Refreshments will be provided and all are invited.
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April 29, 1876 -- SCHOOL NEEDED -- There are a large number of children in the vicinity of our residence, who are now virtually deprived of school privileges.  The distance to the Courthouse is too great.  An appeal made sometime since to the Trustees met with a favorable answer but as yet no school is established.  It seems rather hard that those who pay the taxes to keep the colored schools running, and support colored children in idleness, must be compelled to employ private teachers, or let their children go untaught.  Some 25 to 30 children, we understand, await the establishment of this school.
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April 29, 1876 -- Editors are sometimes appreciated.  Their influence in promoting the material development of a community, in aiding public morals, and in forwarding every good work is greater than all other agencies combined.  Too often their efforts are scorned, and they themselves neglected by those for whom they have most earnestly labored.  The last legislature of Minnesota, however, did not intend that the people of that state should committ (commit) this sin.  A law containing list of exemptions from attachments has been amended by including the personal property of an editor or printer to amount of $2,400.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, June 8, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
April 22, 1876 -- STEAMBOAT LANDING -- Though the courtesy of Mr. Thompson, the agent at Roanoke station, we had an opportunity to inspect the recent improvements made by the Danville railroad company at the steamboat landing at Roanoke.
The stationary engine operating a car on an inclined plane, delivers goods on the deck of the boat or hoists them to the wharf with little ease and rapidity.  The depot platform has been enlarged, and some sixty feet added to the storehouse to accommodate the increasing business.  These are all good signs of prosperity.  We learn that 1300 hogsheads of tobacco were received and shipped at Roanoke last year.  
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April 22, 1876 -- HORSEPEN FARM -- We are greatly interested the other day in some statements made to us by W.J. Dickerson, respecting productions of the Horsepen Farm, now owned and cultivated by his father, E.J. Dickerson.  75 acres of this land last year yielded on an average of twelve barrels of corn to the acre.  From 30 bushels of the Fultz wheat sown, 615 bushels were produced.  Some of this land is capable of producing 25 bushels of wheat to the acre.  Over $1000 dollars were realized from the wheat and hay crop alone.  Mr. D. is a good farmer.
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April 22, 1876 -- A ROANOKE FARM -- We learn that Mr. A.C. Bruce, of Coles Ferry, has become the possessor by gift of a valuable farm in the vicinity of Roanoke and designs to give his personal supervision more especially to its cultivation.  It embraces a large number of acres of rich river bottom, and was formerly, we believe a portion of what was called Randolph's lower quarter.
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April 29, 1876 --  DRAKES BRANCH -- The vicinity of all our railroad stations, just now is a busy place, with teams unloading tobacco hogsheads destined for Richmond.  the (The) large amount of fertilizers to be transported to the respective farms, and perhaps not least the quantities of new goods now being received by our merchants.  Ror (For) all these, and the additional reason that it was a 'sale day' at this point presented a lively scene on Friday morning last.  Teams loading and unloading, the concourse of those who had brought portions of their crop to market, the eager, busy air of buyers as well as sellers, the inviting manners of the warehouse men, the winning smiles and greetings of the auctioneers, the eager expectancy of all, gave the place the air of a true, old fashioned market day.  
Drakes Branch was not a dull place on Friday, and could soree (some) of our northern friends have looked at the scene, they would have been most favorable impressed with the indications of business at this growing point.  Drakes Branch only needs capital and settlers to make it one of the most thriving, as it is one of the most desirable business points in the county.
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April 22, 1876 -- Keysville is growing steadily in all the elements of material prosperity and strength.  The Flag warehouse, under the management of Jeffress and Co. is one of the best in the County.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, May 25, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTT
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
April 8, 1876 -- W.G.F. writing to the Chase City Paper says: "when this country was in its glory, 10 years of Calico would satisfy any moderate sized matron; now the pigmies double it.'  He thinks it is our extravagance which is ruining us, and he is not far from right.
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April 8, 1876 -- THE BLACK HILLS -- Those of our people who want to know how it is done should read the circular advertising excursions which leaves Richmond for Cheyenne, April 17th.  The fare to Cheyenne is $33.25, from thence to Custar City, $10.00.  As an inducement, nuggets and gold are advertised as abundant.  These circulars are scattered freely among the people, and that is the way somebody makes money if the excursions don't.
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April 15, 1876 -- JOSIAH VAUGHN ESQ. -- We regret to learn of the very severe illness of this gentleman, at his residence, near Keysville.  He is a useful member of the school board of his district.
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April 15, 1876 -- We learned that Rev. Paul Whitehead was detained from filing his appointment at the M.E. Church in this village on Sunday last, by reason of the death of his father.
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April 13, 1876 -- SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE -- Under the somewhat high sounding title; Mrs. Louisa M. Smith is now conducting an excellent private school near her residence in Madisonville, or rather in the Madison District.  We have had occasion to speak of the excellence of Mrs. Smith as a public school teacher and congratulate the people of the district upon being able to command the services of so experienced and accomplished a teacher.
The session of the public school has just closed, and we learn that Mrs. S. continues a private session receiving pupils in her family at $10 a month for board.  Tuition in all English branches, $2; music lessons $2.10 per month.
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April 15, 1876 -- COLES FERRY -- Mr. William T. Berry, son of F.J. Berry of this village, has taken the wheelwright's shop at Coles Ferry and is about to establish himself in business at that point.  The opening is a good one and Mr. Berry is a good workman, and we are sure will meet the wishes of his patrons.  Let the people sustain him.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, January 4, 1934
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
April 8, 1876 -- DUPREES OLD STORE -- We publish a communication from this point this week and in reply to the charge that we have said nothing of its business or advantages in our description of the county would say, we know nothing of them.  We have requested information from all parts of the county, but with one or two exceptions have been compelled to prepare descriptions from our own meager knowledge.  We believe we have a subscriber or two at this point, but on our correspondent is not among them.  If the people of the county would take interest enough in their own affairs to sustain their county paper, and through it scatter knowledge of their advantages, we should have more local prosperity.
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April 8, 18786 (1876) -- MOSSINGFORD VA.  April 3rd, 1876 -- ED GAZETTE: -- On last Thursday the times were very lively at Keysville, and about 20,000 pounds of tobacco changed hands at satisfactory figures.  Our Lunenburg friends are beginning to concentrate on Keysville with their four horse loads of the weed, instead of going to distant markets and selling for lower prices.  The sales of tobacco at Scott's Warehouse at Drakes Branch, on last Friday were very lively.  Some 20,000 pounds were sold at figures that made the sellers think Confederate money had started to run again.  The large train of wagons and carts quartered around Scott's Warehouse, reminded your correspondent of Gen. Lee's commissary train in park just before the seven days fight around Richmond.  "There is life in the old land yet."
T.M.J.
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April 8, 1876 -- EXPERIENCE OF A CHARLOTTE BOY -- We were greatly interested not long since, in the following recital of a friend, illustrative of some of the trials as well as successes which have been experienced here.  The narrator was the owner of a good property before the war.
"The surrender found me without money, help or team, and judgment was soon laid upon my lands for a security debt.  One of my boys had secured a little money in greenbacks and when the Federal quartermaster was selling mules at Petersburg he bought some at low prices which furnished him team and as they improved on his hands he sold some for a good profit.  When my farm was sold, as it was, he was able to make first payment, thus retaining the old place.  By industry and effort, he now cleared it.  Every year he has been adding something to his stock, and tho it seemed hard to buy the land which should have been his by right, by his own labor he is now possessor of the home farm."  Other cases of like character, we could cite, which demonstrate what industry and energy, in a few years will accomplish.
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April 15, 1876 -- R.&D.R.R. IMPROVEMENT -- We are glad to notice sundry minor improvements going on in the vicinity of the railroad station at Drakes Branch. A new building is now being erected for the preparation of sand for the tracks also, repairs are being made in and about the station and platform.  We should have soon to be able to report the building of a much needed new station house and agent's residence.
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April 22, 1876 -- RANDOLPH -- We understand that Mr. C.P. Allen is making arrangements for the establishment of increased business at this point.  Among others, he proposes the opening of a blacksmith and wagon maker's shop, to be under the direction of Mr. Green, a practical smith from Richmond.  The opening is a good one, the industry demanded, and we trust will prove a great success.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, May 4, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
December 4, 1875 -- REAL ESTATE IN CHARLOTTE.  Through the kindness of Col. Wm. A. Woods, who was appointed by Judge T.T. Bouldin, assessor of the lands for the lower district of the county, under the law providing for the reassessment of lands with their improvements we are enabled to present the following figures.  Mr. Woods also furnished us with the figures of the upper district, of which Clairborne G. Barksdale, Esq., was the assessor.  So far as we can judge, these gentlemen have performed the duties assigned them in an impartial, thorough and systematic manner.
Dis. No. 1, No. Acres....146,828 1/2
Dis. No. 2, No. Acres....154,692 1/4
Total No. acres in County 301,520 3.4
Dis. No. 1, val. of land $646,335.27
Dis. No. 2, val. of land   798, 705.33
Tot. val of land in Co. $1,436, 040.60
District No. 1, value of buildings $206,325.00
District No. 2, value of buildings 240, 331.00
Total val. of buildings $446,656.00
District No. 1, land and buildings $852,660.27
District No. 2, land and buildings 1,030.036.60
Tot. val. of real estate 1,882,696.60
Average value of land per acre $6.24.5
The valuation of the county in 1870, as reported in the ninth census $2,401,030
By the last report of the several township assessors the No. acres was 301,043
Total valuation $1,966,484.72
Showing a decrease of $83,788.72
The value per acre according to the township assessors' valuation was $6,532.
The value of the personal property of the county according to the last valuation of the township assessors, is $707,665.  Which added to the real estate valuation, as above, $1,882,696.60, gives total property valuation, $2,590,361.60
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March 25, 1876 - BELL WAREHOUSE.  There was an unusual large sale of tobacco at the Bell Warehouse, on Friday last.  We are informed that about 25,00 lbs. were offered, and that the suit of clothes promised byMessrs Jackson & Co., was secured by Clem. Green, who lives on Maj. Gaines' land.  This house is under most excellent management, and highly popular with our farmers and planters.  This house is under most excellent management, and highly popular with our farmers and planters.
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April 8, 1876 -- DIED.  At his father's residence, near Keysville, on the 26th, ult., of diptheria croup Benjamin B., son of Capt. J.R. and C.H. Bailey, aged 6 years and 20 days.  The family have the sympathy of the entire community.
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April 8, 1876 -- HOUSE AT DRAKES.  Mr. J.H. Wingo will offer a most desirable residence for sale at Drakes Branch on the 14th.  It is nearly new, finely located, and is a rare chance.
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BUGGIES, CARRIAGES & etc., -- Harvey Bros., of Danville, are famous for the excellency of all kinds of vehicles built by the.  Their prices are very low and those who want a good buggy or wagon would do well to correspond with them.  And they are Charlotte boys too.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, May 18, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
October 23, 1875 -- LARGE BEETS  W.D. Norvell, Esq., of this village, has raised this season a crop of Manvel Wertzel Beets, ten of which weighed a hundred and five pounds, the largest fourteen pounds, and measuring 34 inches in length.  One which reached our office was 30 inches in length, and 11 inches in circumference.  They go to the State Fair.  Sam says if anybody has any beets to beat those beets he thinks they must be dead beats, sure enough.
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October 23, 1875 -- GOT TO RICHMOND .  Large numbers of our people propose to go to Richmond at the time of the State Fair.  There are three persons who will accompany the Sheriff, but they go to the penitentiary.
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October 23, 1875 -- We are informed that there will be no service at the Episcopal Church, until further notice, Mr. Mason being absent.
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October 23, 1875 -- The Chase City Enterprise says that Mr. Thos. M. Jones, a young lawyer from Mecklenburg, has recently located at Charlotte C.H.  It endorses him as capable, talented and ready fro 'biz.'
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October 23, 1875 -- REPUBLICAN CONVENTION -- There was a Republican Convention held in this village on Tuesday last for the purpose of selecting a candidate for the House of Delegates.
October 30, 1875 -- MARYLAND REFORM SCHOOL FOR GIRLS -- We learn that Mrs. Ella Cole, recently of this village, has received the appointment of the position of Matron in this institution located in Baltimore County Maryland.  The school is doing a benevolent and useful work, and we trust Mrs. Cole will be an acquisition to its management.
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October 30, 1875 -- Daniel and Tucker have Balmoral skirts for 85 cts.; handsome Boulevard skirts for a dollar, worth, a dollar and a half.
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Brown and bleached domestics, yard wide for 10c may be ound (?) at Daniel and Tucker; splendid bargain.\
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And now the autumn winds scatter the dry leaves; the biting frosts of winter are nigh; Daniel & Tucker have overcoats.
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October 30, 1875 -- A HANGING MATTER -- Sam wanted to know who that rascal was they hung on the stoop of Eggleston, Thornton & Co's. the other day.  He said the fellow had on good clothes and fine boots.
November 6, 1875 -- MARRIAGES -- At the residence of the bride's father in Charlotte County, by Rev. T.W. Wharey, Mr. A.M. Jones, of Fluvanna Co., to Miss M. Louise, youngest daughter of David Lee Esq.  No cards.
At the residence of Hezekiah Jackson, October 25; by Rev. E.A. Gibbs, Z.R. Goode, to Miss Annie P. Adams.
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November 6, 1875 - DEATHS -- At Wylliesburg, on the morning of Friday, October 25, Mrs. Sally, wife of L.T. Barnes, aged 26 years.
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November 6, 1875 -- The Aldine for October is received.  It is the great art journal of the county, and should have a place in every family.
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November 6, 1875 -- ENTERTAINMENT AT ASPENWALL -- The Tableaux at Aspenwall was a success, not withstanding the excitements of the day, which consisted among others of a religious meeting at Midway, a political gathering at Hat Creek.  The music was of the highest order, the performances on the violin and piano being especially excellent.  The Tableaux were unique and interesting.  We learned the receipts amounted to about one hundred dollars.  The wish has been expressed that the entertainment should be repeated during the holidays.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, April 27, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
February 26, 1876 -- A HANDSOME PRESENT.  The ladies connected with the Presbyterian church at Drakes Branch, as we understand, have been making an effort to secure a communion service for the benefit of the church.  The fact being made known to Rev. Thos. Hunt, now of New Jersey, and we believe a native here, he very generously purchased and sent to them a very handsome service, valued at $75.  The gift was no less creditable to the donor's heart, than acceptable to the society upon which it was bestowed.
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February 26, 1876 -- DEATH OF ISAAC C. CARRINGTON.  This gentleman died at the asylum at Staunton, on Thursday night of last week, at the age of 64 years.  He was the youngest son of Judge Paul Carrington, Jr., and inherited from his father a large and valuable estate, which he managed with great skill, judgment and success.  He was for many years one of the justices of this county, and was noted for his promptness, fidelity and firmness with which he discharged the duties of his office. 
About 1848 after an exciting contest, he was elected by the Democratic party as a Representative of the County in the Legislature, which position of trust and honor he filled with credit to himself and his constituents.  He has left to mourn his loss, four sons and three daughters.  His remains were brought to Sylvan Hill for Interment on Sunday last.
February 26, 1876 -- DRAKES BRANCH.  It was more gratifying to note the evident signs of improvement at this point.  The proposed extension of Scott's warehouse of sixty feet is now rapidly going forward.  The improvements made by J.H. Thompson on his store and dwelling house, and surrounding grounds, are excellent signs.  The new hotel of Mr. Williams is tasteful in appearance, and sightly in location.  And not the least, the other day, we noticed a force busily engaged in repairing the public highway.  A good road is a sure sign of thrift, energy and prosperity of a people.
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February 26, 1876 -- MOLDAVIA SCHOOL.  Charlotte is fortunate in possessing a school for boys, whose reputation for thoroughness in drill and academic training is probably unsurpassed by any similar school.  Mr. Comfort is a strict disciplinarian and an experienced teacher, and parents may be assured that no effort on his part will be wanting to secure for all committed to his charge the advantage of thorough intellectual and moral discipline.
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February 26, 1876 -- We can but express our deep sympathy with our esteemed friend and brother, Wm. H. Fowlkes, and family in the recent death of his daughter.  May He, who once bore our griefs, and is still our sympathizer, comfort them in their affliction.
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February 26, 1876 -- ACCIDENT.  We regret to learn that in consequences of sudden illness.  Miss Rebecca Smith, residing with her brother, Captain W.H. Smith, fell into the fire, and was severely burned on Monday last.  


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, April 20, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
January 8, 1876 -- THE EARTH QUAKE.  About 12 o'clock on the night of Wednesday, December 22, we were aroused from sound sleep by a loud noise accompanied by a tremulous motion of the house and bed.  It first seemed to us that a large woodpile in our shed had fallen down; and a subsequent concusion (concussion), tho' less violent, suggested thunder.  But the sky was cloudless.  The shock which was so severely felt in Richmond, was generally experienced throughout this region.
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January 8, 1876 -- REV. C.R. BAUGHAN, D.D.  A correspondent informs us that this gentleman, of this county, and recently of Bristol Tennessee, has consented to supply the Presbyterian Church, at Raleigh N.C.  His preaching is attracting large audiences, and the church is greatly encouraged.
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January 8, 1876 -- A CORRECTION.  The Staunton Spectator says that Isaac Dabbs, the colored delegate from this county, was formerly owned by Rev. Q.T. Richardson, of that place inherited from his father.  This is a mistake.  The Dabbs alluded to was a boy of some worth; who came to this county after the surrender.
The present delegate of this county was born and reared upon the estate of John Garnet Esq. and held by ??????? surrender.  His mother, who subsequently married a Brench, lived upon our plantation last year.  And further deponet sayeth not.
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January 8, 1876 -- WYLLIESBURG.  The warehouse here on Saturday week sold 3,000 lbs. of tobacco, at prices which were highly satisfactory. The proprietors have arranged that if the sale is not satisfactory the tobacco may be withdrawn and resold, the amount of the first sale being advanced.
R.N. Perkinson and Bro. are doing good business and rapidly gaining in public favor.  Our friends in that section would do well to give tem (them) a call.
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January 8, 1876 -- DIS. DEP. G. M.  DR. F.J. Gregory of Keysville, has been appointed Dis. Deputy Grand Master for this Masonic District, and a more popular and suitable appointment could not have been made.  The doctor is W.M. of Keysville Lodge, and holds a very high place in the estimation of the brethren of his fraternity as he does of his profession.
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January 8, 1876 -- PASTOR called.  The members of the Village Presbyterian Church and congregation at a meeting held Saturday, extended an unanimous call to Rev. Thomas Drew of Chase City, to assume the pastorial (pastoral) office here; we understand the desire for his acceptance is very general, and we doubt not he would be warmly welcomed in this community.  And the field is an important and inviting one.
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January 8, 1876 -- At the residence of J.R. Kurtz, Esq., at Keysville, by Rev. W.T. Gilliam, Mr. Thomas A. Lenhart, of New Philadelphia, Ohio, to Miss Mattie Shaw of Keysville.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, April 13, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
February 19, 1876 -- BONAIR INSTITUTE.  This school for young ladies, under the direction of Rev. E.A. Gibbs, we are happy to learn, is gaining popularity and numbers.  With the opening of the present session, the number of pupils had so increased, that an additional teacher was found necessary, and the services of of Miss Mary Bouldin, daughter of Judge T.T. Bouldin, were secured.  We have reason to believe that the system of instruction is judicious and thorough, while the moral influence is wholesome and beneficial.  Parents will do well to avail themselves of the advantages thus offered for the training of their daughters.
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February 19, 1876 -- At Harvest Home, the residence of the bride's mother, Mrs. Mary B. Booth, February 16th, by Rev. J.D. Southall, Mr. D.B. Hutcheson and Miss Lelia M. Booth, all of Charlotte County.
At the residence of the bride's father, H.E. Scott, of Charlotte County, February 9th, by Rev. J.H. Davis, of Halifax, Mr. H.G. Franke of Smythe County and Miss Jennie Scott.
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February 12, 1876 -- A JOYFUL RETURN.  R.H. Gillispie, near Rough Creek, lately very unexpectedly returned to his friends in this county.  He has been absent a long period in Jamaica, and other parts, and had been given up as dead.  His return was a glad surprise to his family.
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February 12, 1876 -- We regret to record the death of Miss Ada Jones, daughter, of Jos. and Mary Jones, near Wylliesburg, on Friday of last week, in the 19th year of her age.  Her funeral was on Sabbath.  She was a member of Antioch church, and was greatly beloved.
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February 12, 1876 -- ANOTHER AGED CITIZEN GONE.  Mrs. Nancy Chaffin, widow of the late Thomas Chaffin, of Wylliesburg, recently deceased, in the 89th year of her age.  She was a member of the Shiloh Baptist Church.
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March 4th, 1876 -- INSURANCE.  We think we have stated elsewhere that the charter of Chase City has been so amended that no liquor can now be sold within the corporation limits, or within one mile around.  This is one kind of a protection and a good one; now if the moral sentiment of the people backs up the prohibition, the community will prosper.
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March 11, 1876 -- A NEW DEPARTURE.  Messrrs. Jackson & Co. of Drakes Branch, having reorganized their firm, propose to return to the cash system, upon which they first started in business.  The practice of large credits they are convinced is as injurious to the buyer, as to themselves; and they now invite all their friends to co-operate with them in a return to a system which should insure low prices, small profits, good, fresh goods, and good returns.  With a large stock and every attention to the wants of the costumer, they hope, not only to retain their present large patronage, but to secure a largely extended trade.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, April 6, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
January 22, 1875 -- KEYSVILLE.  Our friends at Keysville finding their population and business interests increasing, have of late been agitating the subject of a village incorporation.  Several meetings have been held, but some opposition manifesting itself, it has been concluded to defer the matter for future action.  The necessity for a local government, will no doubt, be increasingly apparent.
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January 22, 1876 -- SCOTT'S WAREHOUSE.  The business at this establishment has so increased as to render an extension of the originally large building absolutely imperative.  What with the heaps upon the flour, and the large quantity on tiers, some 90,000 lbs. and the increasing business on every sale day, the proprietor, Mr. T.W. Scott finds enlargement necessary.  He proposes an addition of 60 feet.  This evidence of prosperity is encouraging......Despite the cold weather on Friday last, a large quantity of tobacco was sold at good prices, some as high as $9.50.
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January 22, 1876 -- DEATH OF AN AGED CITIZEN.  On Monday last, Mr. Jas. Morrison departed this life at his residence in this village.  He was one of the oldest citizens of Charlotte.  His age was 80 years, 9months (9 months) and 17 days.  Mr. M. was we believe, a native of Appomattox, but nearly all his life a resident here.  Of industrious habits and amiable (amiable) disposition, he was respected and beloved by all who knew him.  He was a constituent member of Mt. Tirzah Baptist Church, in which for many years he filled the office of deacon.  For some months he has been gradually failing.  He was a good man and his end was peace. 
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January 22, 1876 -- ROANOKE STATION.  On a recent visit to this point, we regretted to see an evidence of a lack of the business activity, especially at the tobacco warehouse, which has heretofore characterized this point.
Talcott is in the midst of a most fertile country, it is at the junction of the Staunton with the railroad and should be the center of a large local and increasing business.
Mr. D.B. Hutcheson has assumed control of one of the business houses there, and we doubt not will be the means of awaking more activity. His personal popularity, combined with attention to the wants of his customers, will doubtless give him a large trade.
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February 5, 1876 -- M.E. Church.  We understand that Rev. Mr. Gibbs has commenced a series of short lectures, at his Tuesday evening service, on the subject of prayer.  They promise to be highly interesting.
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February 5, 1876 -- ANOTHER AGED CITIZEN GONE.  Mr. John Wood died at his residence, near Drakes Branch, on Saturday last, in the 66th year of his age.  It was not long since that he was called upon to record the decease of his wife.  Mr. Wood was one of our oldest citizens. His burial took place, as we learn, on Sunday.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, March 30, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
November 8, 1875 -- We understand that Rev. E.S. Taylor, late pastor at Keysville, has been called to a pastorate within the bounds of the Concord Association, and also to act as Missionary of that body on a united salary of $1,000.
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November 6, 1875 -- PLANK ROAD BRIDGE.  This structure has been rebuilt under the direction of commissioners appointed by the court.  The contractors, Messrs Lloyd and Barksdale have performed the work in a substantial manner, using the material of the old bridge so far as it was possible to do so.  The bridge is some 150 feet long, a single roadway, 10 feet in the clear.  It is not covered, as formerly, but protected on either side by a railing some 5 feet in height.  It is believed to be substantial and safe.  The cost was $56?.
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November 6, 1875 -- NEW STORE AT WYLLIESBURG.  Messrs R.N. Perkinson and Bro., have just opened a new store at Wylliesburg in connection with their warehouse at this point. These gentlemen are energetic business men, and will soon make their announcement through our columns.  
November 6, 1875 -- An editor is not omniscient; a great many things he will not know unless informed of them.
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November 13, 1875 -- SUNNY SIDE, S.S. School.  The closing exercises of this school were held Oct. 23 at the public schoolhouse known by the above name.  The morning was spent in the presentation of the prizes and in singing.
Miss Sallie Barksdale received the first prize for having committed and recited over thirty five hundred verses in the Bible.
Miss Katie Kopal took the second prize, a nice story book, for the recital of twenty five hundred verses.
Dinner being announced, we repaired to the table, which did not look much like hard times, and fully refreshed the inner man with both substantials and sweets.
After dinner, we were entertained with a neat and appropriate address from our Superintendent, J.E. Tucker, than whom there is no more zealous, untiring and devoted laborer in the Sunday Schcool (School) cause.
Addresses were made by several others present and altogether we had a most delightful and enjoyable time.  Sunnyside is a flourishing school, and is working a power of good in the neighborhood in which it is located.  Yours,
Mossingford, Nov. 8, 1875.
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November 20, 1875 -- REAL ESTATE CHANGES.  I.R. Watkins, Esq., of this village recently purchased the Lodge property, containing about 60 acres, and now occupied by Mr. L.C. Puryear.
He subsequently exchanged this property with Mr. T.M. Hilton, for 60 acres of land on Ward's Fork.
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November 27, 1875 -- HON. HUGH BLAIR GRISBY.  This gentleman, resident in this county, and Hon. Mark Alexander, are the only two surviving members of the Constitutional Convention of 1829.  Mr. Grigsby was, we believe, the youngest member of that body.  On Tuesday last, he entered upon his seventieth year, retaining still the vivacity of youth, combined with the results of high culture and most extensive historical research.  He delivers the historical address at the approaching anniversary of Hampden-Sidney.  With continued vigor, may he see yet many returns of his birthday.
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November 20, 1875 -- TO BE LET.  We are gratified to be able to state that last week the jail in this village was tenantless.  This is an event, so rare it is worth gazetting.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, March 23, 1933
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

OLD CHARLOTTE
(TAKEN FROM OUR FILES)
September 18, 1875 -- Roanoke Station, Va., ED. GAZETTE--Dear Sir: We are glad to state, as well as a number of your readers will be glad to hear, that the Roanoke Warehouse has recently been opened for the sale of tobacco, and has every promise of a large business during the coming year.  Some 20,000 lbs. priming changed hands here during the past week; prices today ranging from $1 to $3.50 per cwt.  Our buyers are eager for them when properly cured.  The many friends of W.E. Gaines will be pleased to know that he is permanetntly (permanently) located here, and is now filling an order for 300,000 lbs. of primings.  Mr. Gaines is an acknowledged wheel-horse in the business and will add greatly to the trade; in fact he is one of the "indispensibles."
Crops are elegant along the Staunton; never knew them better.  There is some complaint of fire in the tobacco.  The weed is now being cut and housed.  All quiet, politically.  Our people will be found standing by our nominee for Legislature when voting time comes.
Yours Truly
SUBSCRIBER
October 2, 1875 -- MARRIED, at the residence of the bride's father, Whitlock, Halifax County, Va., September 29th, by Rev. H.C. Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney College, Robert F. Hutcheson, Esq., of Charlotte County, and Miss Mollie eldest daughter of Thos. Barksdale, Esq., of Halifax.
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October 2, 1875 -- TOURNAMENT.  Chase City, Va. Ed. Gazette: I have the pleasure of saying that I attended a grand tournament at Ft. Mitchell Depot, on Friday, September 17th.  This tournament was gotten up by Mr. P.E. Fore, of that place, and through his untiring energy and kind and hospitable courtesy extended to all, it proved quite a success, everybody being pleased except some young ladies of the neighborhood, who expected the crown, and failed to get it on account of the successful knights preferring to fix that honor upon the heads of some others more deserving.
Mr. A.G. Towler, Jr., proved to be the successful Knight, and crowned, as queen of Love and beauty, Miss Nanie Priddy.
Mr. Jno. W. Knight crowned Miss Helen Williams; 1st maid of honor.
Mr. C. Jenkins crowned Miss Addie Marable 2nd Maid of Honor.
Mr. F. Clark crowned Miss Jenkins 3rd Maid of Honor.  Mr. P.E. Fore's roan horse, rode by Mr. Towler, made best time, making his 50 yards in 3 1-2 seconds.
Speeches were by the following eloquent gentleman, Dr. Jno. S. Bayne, Mr. Louis Burwell, and Mr. J. Wood, after which the crowd partook of dinner.  They then returned to the depot where they found a number of musicians awaiting them.
We had good music and dancing, and, but Mr. Editor please don't say anything about it, some of the best dancers on the floor were some of Bro. Taylor's church members.  You can publish this if you think proper, but don't let us be too public about it; I am trying to keep it a secret.  I am, very truly your friend.
AN OBSERVER
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October 30, 1875 -- THE EAGLE HOTEL.  We learn that Judge Dickenson spoke in the highest terms of his accomodations (accommodations) at this house. Judicial endorsement is something, and we have no doubt that it was a sound opinion; but this time the judge is on the popular side, for everybody endorses his opinions.
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October 30th, 1875 -- REV. A.B. CARRINGTON.  We regret to learn that this gentleman has been attacked with hemorrhage, demanding at least partial respite from public speaking.
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October 30, 1875 -- MEETING AT KEYSVILLE.  We have no report of the speech of Col. Green at Keysville, last Saturday; but learn he made a good speech, as he could not well do otherwise.  We trust Keysville will give a good account of herself on Tuesday.  The sturdy yeoman of Walton will not be found wanting in zeal for sound conservative principles, when the question is between a negro and a white man.