Weather News Items from Local Newspapers

Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, August 9, 1928.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 We were very glad to see the long wished for rain which came Saturday evening. For several weeks we have been suffering a very serious drought that seemed to extend over several counties.  We were blessed with a fine rain on Saturday evening, but in some sections the drought is still unbroken.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, April 26, 1928.
ubmitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 We feel that much of the early fruit will be damaged from the frost and cold the past few days.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, April 26, 1928.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 Sunday was an April day all right.  Rain, hail, and snow.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, May 3, 1928.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 The weather continues cold and wet, which greatly hampers the farming industry.  There is much complaint in our section about the scarcity of plants and the destruction of them by flies.  Gardens also are unusually late.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, May 3, 1928.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 There was quite a storm Friday.  The roof of one of Mr. Pugh's tenant houses was blown off.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, January 15, 1885.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 Two shocks of an earthquake were sensibly felt in the upper part of the State on 2d.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, April 11, 1940
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

It Was Cold

Lawrence Vassar, manager of the Charlotte County telephone company, says that during the cold weather we had the latter part of January women's voices froze on the telephone lines and that when the thaw came and the voices began to come in it was terrible.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, February 28, 1940
Submitted By:  
Bea Adams King
Old Charlotte  (Taken from the Gazette files of 54 years ago)

Almost A Flood

The heavy and continuous rains of last week were productive of much damage to crops, roads and bridges in this section.
The bridge over Twitty's Creek, at Drakes Branch, was washed away, also the bridge at Eureka Mills.  Mr. H.C. Grisby lost heavily by the breaking of his dike, and Mr. Jordan Wingo, suffered from the same cause.  A great deal of the wheat was washed away, and much that remained has sprouted.  The loss in this county will run up into the thousands, but at the time of writing, full accounts have not been received from all points.  The railroad was badly washed toward Danville, such the mail was delayed.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, April 4, 1940
Submitted By
:  Bea Adams King
Old Charlotte  (Taken from the Gazette files of 54 years ago)

The earthquake is now the topic of conversation in every circle.  The shocks were severe and repeated, and accompanied by a rumbling noise.  A flame was seen, redder than lightning, flashing across the earth, only a few feet above the earth.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, July 10, 1873
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

THUNDER STORM -- There was one of the most brilliant display of fire works on the night of the 4th inst. which we have ever witnessed.  The heavens were most vividly and constantly illuminated, and the rolling thunder, with three especial crashing discharges, rendered the scene of of awful sublimity and grandeur.
The rain poured down in torrents, doing no little damage to crops in our vicinity.  Oats were prostrated and tobacco lands much washed.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, May 15, 1873
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

FRESHET-- The recent rains have inundated the low grounds.  There has been a terrible freshet in Stanton river, and a great destruction of the wheat crop.  Mr. Charles Bruce estimates his loss at 3000 to 4000 bushels.  The river was higher than it has been since 1862.  Farmers throughout the county have suffered considerably.