Crime News Items from Local Newspapers

Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, December 18, 1873.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 In the case of Christopher Crafts convicted of the murder of William Jeffries, at Danville, in August 1873, and sentenced to be hung on the 20th Nov., the Court of Appeals has decided that there was no error and that Crafts should be hung at such time as the Danville court may determine.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 27, 1928.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 GEO. C. MILLER GIVEN THREE MONTHS, $150 FINE
Mr. Geo. C. Miller was tried Saturday at Charlotte Court House before Justice of the Peace, M. F. McGehee, and on recommendation of attorney for the commonwealth, was given three months in jail and fined $150.  Miller entered a plea of guilty of possessing ardent spirits.  It will be remembered that Mr. Miller's premises, were searched Sunday, September 16th and about four gallons of the "forbidden juice" was found.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, May 24, 1928.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 AN EXPLANATION
Mr. E. H. Layne, convicted of last term of court for violation of the prohibition law, asks us to explain that he was let off with a suspended sentence.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 A suit has been commenced by the McVeighs of Alexandria for property confiscated during the war.  Among other property are houses and lots valued at $100,000.


Source:  Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

An attempt was made to wreck the Erie cars near Passaic on the 19th, by a man named McKeon.  He is, of course, supposed to be insane.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

Susan B. Anthony has been found guilty of voting in violation of law.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 The seconds in the late duel between Messrs. Mordecai and McCarty have been bailed by Judge B.W. Lacy, of New Kent County, the amount of bail given by each being $5,000.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 The Washington Star states that Rev. John S. Ezell, a Baptist clergyman of South Carolina, who was sentenced to the Albany penitentiary for alleged connivatice with ku-kluk out outrages, has been pardoned by the President.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 The District Attorney of Canadaigua, New York, entered a "nolle prosequi" in each of the cases of fourteen women indicted with Miss Anthony, for illegal voting.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, July 3, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

The trial of Walworth, for the killing of his father, commenced on the 24th.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, March 15, 1928.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 LARGE STILL CAPTURED SATURDAY AFTERNOON
One of the largest stills that has been captured in Charlotte county for many months was taken Sunday afternoon near Bailey's Store.  The still and whiskey had been loaded on a wagon, ready to be moved, and if the officers had not arrived when they did, it is not probable they would have found the paraphernalia.  The officers got a still of 400 gallons capacity, 38 gallons of liquor, six cases of fruit jars, one mule, 1 one horse wagon. The officers captured a colored man and saw several white men run.
Those composing the raid party were:  J. Kent Early, S.A. Jackson, L.J.  Yeaman, Luther Lindsay, A.W. Donald, and O.M. Locke.
The still and liquor was carried to Charlotte Courthouse and placed in jail.  The mule and wagon was also carried to the Courthouse.  We have not heard whether, the mule was white or not.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, July 10, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

A colored boy named Jack Collins from Drakes Branch was arrested yesterday for stealing and selling a hat belonging to W.O. Thomas, who is employed in this office,  from the hall of the Eagle Hotel.  On examination before Judge Moore, he was sent to jail for the day.  He has been lounging about the village for some days.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, July 10, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 HELD FOR TRIAL - On Tuesday, Anderson Miller, colored, was brought before Justice Moore, on a charge of felony.  Miller, who has been in the employ of Wm. H. Smith, suddenly left some week or two since, and about the same time, a pocketbook containing a considerable sum of money was missed by the father of Mr. Smith.  Miller, was observed to spend money freely, and suspicion being aroused, and search was made, and some of the money recovered from him.  Miller's statement is that he found it near the store.  The remains of the pocketbook were found on the fire hearth in his house.  He was committed to await the action of the Grand Jury in September.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, May 29, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 COMMITTED - On the 24th, Albert Barrett, and  ? Reed, colored, were committed to jail on warrant of Samuel Baldwin, of Roanoke, charged with breaking open the barn of  P.J. Stearns on the night of the 22d and stealing 200 lbs. tobacco.  A special grand jury often is summoned for next court day.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, January 15, 1855.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 A colored man named Baker Moseley was brought before Justice Marshall charged with breaking into the tobacco barn of Mr. Archer Moseley in the lower part of the Co.  He was sent on to the Grand Jury.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, Thursday, January 15, 1885.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 John Brown, the colored boy, who was tried at the Co. Court for shooting young Adams, was acquitted.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, October 30, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 A LESSON TO LAW BREAKERS - On the night of the 28th; on returning home we found our family in great affliction from the abusive treatment of the negro, Isaac Dabbs; who sometime since was placed under bonds to keep the peace toward us and our family.  We found also that he, as well as Thos. Brown, another negro in our employ, had by threats and violence obtained the keys to our barn, and had conveyed away a portion of the fodder there stored.  Their plea was that we had not paid them for it.  Our account with them shows that they are nearly twenty dollars in our debt for cash advanced, beside owing us largely for rent.
On examination before Justices Comfort and Moore, on Wednesday, they were committed to jail for ten days, and to pay the cost of prosecution.  With us, negro insolence has reached its limit.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, September 4, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 Geo. Smith, the conductor of the freight train which occasioned the accident on the Marietta railroad, has been arrested.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, Thursday, July 31, 1873.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 AFFRAY AT MECKLENBURG:  Several young men, by the name of Hicks, residing near Mecklenburg C.H., attended court on Monday of last week, and had an altercation with some horse dealers.  In the affray, bowie-knives and pistols were freely used, and some of the combatants, were fatally injured.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, September 8, 1955.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 LARGE STILL CAPTURED IN CHARLOTTE COUNTY
A large Moonshine Still was discovered and destroyed on Sunday, in Charlotte County, near Mossingford, just off Rt. 653.  The still was in a dense thicket about 300 feet from Roanoke Creek.  The still was covered with a tar paper top and the men had a tent set up in the woods to sleep six people.
The still was considered a 1000 gallon still by the capturing officers.  At the still was twenty 400 gallon Fermentors, two 60 gallon Doublers, one 400 gallon Cooling Box, an electric pump, 300 feet of plastic pipe, 1 horse and wagon, bale hay and bag feed and 70 gallons of Moonshine.
No one was caught at the still at the time it was taken. It took six sticks of dynamite to destroy the still and its contents. Officers participating in the raid were Sheriff W.O. Pillow, State Troopers Buchanan and McGee, and ABC Officers Blackburn and Creedle.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, August 18, 1955.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 120 GALLONS OF MOONSHINE TAKEN NEAR MEHERRIN
State Police Officers, Saturday night and early Sunday morning, were checking cars on Route 360 for their driving licenses, and registration cards.  An automobile approached the inspection station headed toward Richmond, but failed to stop as directed and started speeding toward Burkeville.  A State Police sitting in his car across the road saw the car and made pursuit.  After reaching speeds over 100 mph, the car was finally stopped near Burkeville. The car was operated by two Negro men from Danville and has 120 gallons of moonshine whiskey in the back seat, covered with a blanket.
The car was a Ford, with an Offenhauser Racing motor in it, with air springs.  The driver had a safety belt strapped around him for helping him in case of an accident.  The men were brought to the Lunenburg Jail, where they are now awaiting trial.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, March 26, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 ATTEMPTED ESCAPE - We are informed that Redman, who was conveyed to Amelia jail for safe keeping, made an attempt to escape from that institution last week.  He had well nigh succeeded, when the falling of the iron bar with which he had been at work, aroused the jailor, and frustrated his design.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, March 19, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 A DISHONEST WOOD CUTTER - Lem Seldon, a colored man, was engaged to cut cord wood for Mr. W.D. Norvell and reported six cords cut, which were paid for by Mr. N.  But when he, Mr. N., commenced hauling his wood he found Lem had put two bushels of leaves and a pile of pine brush in the middle of the cords and consequently Mr. N. was minus considerable wood.  He is anxious to obtain information of the present whereabouts of the shrewd operator.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, March 19, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 AGGREVATED ASSAULT - We regret to learn that an aggravated assault was made upon the person of Mr. L.S. Squire, at his residence at Randolph, on Sunday, the 8th inst.  It is well known in this community that a suit in chancery is pending between Mr. Squire and Mr. C.P. Allen, with reference to the property known as Randolph; and also that a suit was brought by Mr. A. Banker, for services against Mr. S., at the late term of the Court. 
It appears that the cows of Mr. Squire had been upon a clover lot belonging to Mr. Allen, and were being driven toward the ? on the day alluded to, when Mr. S. went out to see Mr. Allen in regard to them passing, as we are informed, toward the end of the house, and near Mr. A. this person aimed a violent blow at the side of the head of Mr. S., and Mr. Banker who was near came up, joining the attack,  Mr. S. being knocked senseless.  A son and daughter of Mr. Squire, endeavored to protect their father, and the young lady succeeded in beating one of the assailants off with a fence paling.  The wife of Mr. Squire who is in feeble health, attracted by the cries of the children, endeavored to shield her husband by falling upon his prostrate form.  A third person, also, named Chilson, came to the assistance of the assaulting party, who finally desisted from their attack, but not until Mr. S. was severely beaten, his person bearing the marks of heavy blows, though fortunately not permanently injured.
We regret exceedingly to ? a case of this character; nor would we do it, but Mr. Squire desires the true facts to be known.  Mr. S. is well known in this community, and is far from being what is termed a fighting man; and it is to be regretted that such scenes should occur among neighbors and even relatives.  Mr. Allen being a nephew by marriage of Mr. Squire.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, November 21, 1878.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 A GRANDSON OF PATRICK HENRY - The N.Y. Herald says:  A typical "Johnny Reb" was arraigned for intoxication before Judge Kilbreth at the  Police Court on Saturday afternoon.  Tall, gaunt and seedy looking, he brushed back his long straight hair as he hobbled on his crutch and faced the Court.
"Have you ever been in old Virginny, Judge?" he asked, utterly indifferent to the charge against him "Oh, it's a glorious country," and he quoted a few lines from Byron.  "Let me go Judge, I fought under General Lee."
"I'll talk to you when you're sober," said the Judge, and the prisoner was remanded.  Yesterday he was himself again.  His name he gave as Wyatt Caldwell, a grandson of Patrick Henry.  He fought in the rebel army and was wounded in the second battle of Bull Run.  The Judge allowed him to go.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, July 2, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 A THIEF CAUGHT - For some time articles have been missed from the storeroom at the residence of Mr. C. Hannawinkle, and a bell was placed in such a position that an alarm would be given in case the door was opened.  While the family was at supper, on the night of the 26th, the bell was heard and Mr. T.J. Harvey, going to the place, at once found a colored woman named Willie Ann Barksdale at the door.  Being charged with going into the room she denied it, and said she stumbled against the door, which made the bell ring.  On Saturday she made a confession, and gave up a false key, with which, from time to time, she had gone into the room.  She was brought before Justice Moore, who sentenced her to twenty days imprisonment, and to pay the costs.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 25, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 ATTEMPT TO KILL - A negro named Ned Jones was arrested near Rough Creek, on the 18th, for attempting to cut his wife's throat with his pocket knife.  He was examined before Justices C.M. Pugh and E. Ramsey, and committed for trial.  He states that there was some bantering between them, when she said "you had better cut my throat," and he playfully drew his knife across it, supposing he used the back of the blade.  Rather a serious joke.


Source:   The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 25, 1874
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 WHIPPED - A colored boy, named Wyatt, was charged with stealing $5 from the store of N.E. Flournoy.  On Saturday he was examined before Justice Comfort and sentenced to four months imprisonment, or to receive thirty-nine lashes.  He chose the whipping, which was duly administered by E.B. Davis.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 18, 1874.
Submitted by:  Bea. Adams King

 COUNTY LINE X ROADS
Charlotte Co., Va., June 12, 1874
Mr. Editor: - Thinking that something from this out of the way place would interest your readers, I thought that I would write you a few lines. On the 4th of the present month, John Begger, living in Prince Edward, a few miles below here, went after strawberries, and while in the field, was taken by some persons and horribly mutilated.  He was found in a helpless condition by some boys that evening.  He was almost exhausted from loss of blood. 
The persons who did the rascally act threatened to take his life if he told who did it, and he positively refuses to tell who they were.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 4, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 CASE OF A.W.C. REDMOND - This case was closed on Saturday night, the jury bringing in a verdict of acquittal.  We were unable to attend the trial, but have heard the argument of W.H. Woods, Com. At., highly commended.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, June 4, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 IN the case of Com. vs. Ned Bradley, indicted for breaking the barn of D.B. Brittan, and stealing one bushel of wheat, the prisoner pleaded guilty and was sentenced to four months in the county jail.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, December 2, 1926.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 COLLIE WALLACE TO SERVE SENTENCE
Virginia Supreme Court On Last Friday Refused Him Writ of Error.
Collie Wallace will have to serve thirty-five years in the penitentiary for the murder of Rush Nappier in Charlotte County.  So the Virginia Supreme Court of appeals held in effect last Friday when it refused him a writ of error.  Nappier's body was found the morning of April 22, 1926 by some school children in the rear of an abandoned house known as the Watkin's place, lately occupied by bootleggers, the evidence being that he had been shot to death. 
 Both Collie Wallace and his brother, Roy Wallace were indicted for the murder but after the conviction of the former, the indictment against Roy Wallace was nolle prossed.  The commonwealth sought to establish that Nappier was shot and killed by Collie Wallace on the premises of the latter’s home, five miles distant from the Watkin's place, the morning of April 18, and that Collie Wallace and his brother then carried the body in an automobile to the spot where it was found.  Collie Wallace denied all knowledge of the murder and in his petition to the supreme court insisted that the evidence was entirely insufficient to convict him.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA, Thursday, March 6, 1879.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 BURGLARY - On Sunday last I.O. Lipscomb entered Green's store, at Priddy's, evidently for the purpose of robbery.  He was seen to enter, and a boy told a Mr. Carrington who gave information leading to his arrest and consignment to jail.  He rifled the money drawer, obtaining about $5.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA, Thursday, March 6, 1879.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 JUDGE BOULDIN - On Monday, M.M. Martin, Esq., announced the indictment of Judge Bouldin in the U.S. Court, to which allusion elsewhere is made and asked the passage of a resolution pledging the county to bear the expense of his trial exclusive of his lawyer’s fees.  Information being asked, the Clerk stated that immediately on his induction in office, Judge Bouldin inquired for suitable colored men to be placed on juries, and some were selected, but at their own request they had been stricken from the jury list.  The statute gives the judge exclusive control of this matter.
Capt. J.W. White moved the reference of the matter to a Committee of five to consider and report.  This substitute for the original motion was lost, and the whole subject indefinitely postponed.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA, Thursday, March 5, 1874.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 BOLD ROBBERY - On Court day, while Mr. A.A. Wilbon was busily engaged many persons being in the store, a negro was seen to take down a pair of pants, examine them, roll them up, conceal them under his coat, and pass rapidly out of the store.  The person who saw this remarked to another standing by "that negro has stolen a pair of pants."  The person thus informed communicated the intelligence to Mr. Wilbon, who at once started for the thief, who was then lost in the crowd.  It seems singular absence of mind which prevented the first person from seizing the thief, or even the second from making an immediate outcry instead of so quietly communicating the knowledge of the act to the proprietor, and thus allow the thief to escape.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, Thursday, April 23, 1874
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 WYLLIESBURG, April 13th, 1874
ED. GAZETTE - On Saturday night, the 11th inst., Mr. E.J. Wherly, merchant at Wylliesburg discovered on the person of the so called Rev. J.S. Henderson, colored, a watch chain and seal belonging to him.  Taking hold of the chain, he asked the gentleman of the cloth where he got that chain.  Henderson replied, "I bought it in Richmond."  Mr. Wherly held on to the chain and had the gentleman arrested.  He was brought before Justices Booth and Barnes, who sentenced him to ten days in the county jail.  He prayed an appeal which was granted and the case will go before our next county court.  May justice follow him.
We have a Grange in successful working order, with Jno. B. Barnes, Master, and R.O. Robertson, Sec.  Farmers are very much interested in the movement.  We outsiders are expecting great results from the "new movement."  Wylliesburg is still going up.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA, Thursday, March 12, 1874
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 ARRESTED - Robt. Scott, a colored individual belonging to Meherrin, was arrested by a special police officer, as he was about to get upon the cars at Drakes Branch, for the robbery of the pants from the store of A.A. Wilbon, Jr., alluded to by us last week.  He had the things on when arrested.  On being brought before Justice Moore, he was sentenced to 30 days imprisonment, and to pay all the costs, including his board.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA, Thursday, January 12, 1905.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

OFFICER ASSAULTED
On the 10th day of November last, the stable, barn and forage, belonging to F.I. Carrington, living near Saxe, was set on fire and destroyed.  A detective was employed and worked the case up, and on Monday Constable Henry Barksdale went with a warrant to arrest a negro, Henry Toombs, at his house, for the crime.  As he was reading the warrant, Mary Toombs, the man's daughter, caught up an axe and slipping behind the officer struck him on the head.  
The blow was a severe one, and either cracked or fractured the skull.  Both negroes were afterwards arrested, and, on Tuesday, were lodged in jail.  This makes nine parties in jail now awaiting trial.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA, Thursday, February 3, 1966.
Submitted by
:  Bea. Adams King

 Arrests Made In Clarksville After Area Break-In
Clarksville police last week arrested four persons wanted for questioning in connection with a series of break-ins at Dillwyn, Keysville and Drakes Branch.
Clarksville Police Chief C.M. Newcomb said a car used by the quartet contained eight chain saws and 11 bottles of whiskey, all stolen Monday night. The saws, he said, were taken from an establishment in Dillwyn, while the whiskey came from the state ABC store in Drakes Branch.  Newcomb said two of the men were carrying pistols stolen from the Hamner Hardware Store in Keysville.
Clarksville Police Officer Satterwhite said he saw a car bearing Indiana plates pass through town on U.S. Rt. 58 in a "zig-zag manner."  He followed the car and stopped it at the edge of town. The driver, identified as William L. Fowler, 55, of Keysville, was charged with carrying a concealed weapon. Luther Vaughan, 46, also was charged with having a concealed weapon on his person, and Henry Carter, 35, was charged with being drunk.  They were arrested later at a local laundromat, although officers said they had been in the car with Fowler. Mildred Fulcher, of Farmville, also was charged with drunkenness.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, February 29, 1940
Submitted By;  Bea Adams King

 News Notes

 Tom Harris, a colored youth of erratic tendencies, was before Mayor Norvell last week, charged with an assault upon his sister with an axe.  Thirty days in jail.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, March 7, 1940
Submitted By;  Bea Adams King

 Clyde Tweed Pleads Guilty To Larceny Charge

 The March term of the Charlotte Circuit court opened Monday with Judge Joel W. Flood presiding.  Six indictments were returned by special grand jury, four of which were against Clyde Tweed, for breaking and entering with intent to commit larceny.  He pled guilty in each case and was sentenced in each to 18 months in the State penitentiary which sentence was suspended and the defendant recommitted to the custody of the State Board of Public Welfare.
The case of Commonwealth vs. Sam St. John for Mayhem was continued to Thursday of this week.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, February 15, 1940
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

"Rock" Rogers Fined $50 In Court Tuesday

W.J. "Rock" Rogers, of Phenix, was fined $50.00 and cost; received a thirty days suspended jail sentence and was interdicted for twelve months in Trial Justice court of Charlotte County Tuesday when he was found guilty of selling ABC liquor without license on February 3, on which date ABC inspectors A.R. Hershman and Newman raided his home and found 67 1-2 pints of ABC liquor in his possession, which was confiscated in court Tuesday.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, March 7, 1940
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

Clyde Tweed Pleads Guilty to Larceny Charge

The March term of the Charlotte Circuit Court opened Monday with Judge Joel W. Flood presiding.  Six indictments were returned by special grand jury, four of which were against Clyde Tweed, for breaking and entering with intent to commit larceny.  He plead guilty in each case and was sentenced in each to 18 months in the State Penitentiary.

John Wesley Seay plead guilty to grand larceny and was sentenced to one year in the penitentiary which sentence was suspended and the defendant recommitted to the custody of the State Board of Public Welfare.
The case of Commonwealth vs. Sam St. John for Mayhem was continued to Thursday of this week.


Source: The Charlotte Gazette, Smithville, VA., Thursday, February 18, 1897
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

Jailed for Shooting

Addison Pettus, col'd, was brought to jail on Thursday, by Deputy Sheriff Dickerson, on the charge of malicious shooting of Landon Thomas, on January 24th.  The warrant has been out for him for some time, but he had succeeded in dodging the officer until last week. The shooting occurred while the parties were returning from a frolic near Mossingford; Thomas was hit in the leg.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Smithville, VA., Thursday, June 25, 1874.
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

ATTEMPT TO KILL -- A negro named Ned Jones was arrested near Rough Creek, on the 18th, for attempting to cut his wife's throat with his pocket knife.  He was examined before Justices C.M. Pugh and E. Ramsey, and committed for trial.  He states that there was some bantering between them, when she said "you had better cut my throat," and he playfully drew his knife across it, supposing he used the back of the blade.  Rather a serious joke.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Smithville, VA., Thursday, June 25, 1874.
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

WHIPPED -- A colored boy, named Wyatt, was charged with staling $5 from the store of N.E. Flournoy.  On Saturday he was examined before Justice Comfort and sentenced to four months imprisonment, or to receive thirty-nine lashes.  He chose the whipping, which was duly administered by E.B. Davis.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, May 28, 1873.
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

COMMITTED -- On the 24th, Albert Barrett and Brown Reed (colored) were committed to jail on warrant of Samuel Baldwin of Roanoke, charged with breaking open the barn of P.J. Stearns on the night of the 22d, and stealing 200 lbs. tobacco.  A special Grand Jury of ten is summoned for next court day.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, May 22, 1873.
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

RESISTING AN OFFICER -- On Monday night, about 11 o'clock, a colored man, by the name of Ben. Williams, was arrested for fellony on the farm of Mr. Jacob Morton; as the officers approached him, he first threatened to shoot with a musket, and afterwards drew his knife.  On being disarmed and tied, he managed to free himself and in the darkness of the night to run; the officers fired upon him, hitting on the shoulder and thigh.  He was conveyed to the jail on Tuesday morning, and his wounds examined by Dr. Joel Watkins, who does not consider them fatal, though serious.  Williams is a notorious character, and has twice before been arrested and made his escape.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, June 26, 1873.
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

DEATH IN JAIL -- Not long since a colored man, named Ben Williams, who had been guilty of stealing tobacco from the farm of Capt. White, and for some time had eluded the officers, was arrested on the farm of Mr. J.W. Morton.  It seems he had stated he was not well and should not leave again even if arrested.  He, however, made severe resistance to the officers, and on being bound and placed on a mule to be brought to the court house, he managed to slip his cords, and in the darkness he attempted to escape.  He was fired upon and re-captured, and brought to the jail.  His wounds at the time were pronounced most serious by the physician, yet it was thought he would recover.  He appeared to be doing well, when on Sunday last he died.
An inquest was held by magistrate Moore, acting as coroner.  The following jury was impaneled:  A.A. Wilbon, foreman; F.C. Thornton, J.D. Shepperson, J.P. Marshall, H.A. Marshall, S.P. Daniel, T.C. Morrisette, J.P. Nanny, Wm. H. Smith, Wm. T. Ferris, Geo. C. Smith, A. Barksdale.
After a full examination the jury rendered the following verdict: "That the deceased came to his death by a gun shot wound over the left chest, inflicted by the hands of some unknown person, (death probably super-induced by disease previously contracted.)"


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, December 24, 1925
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

SHERIFF PRIDDY GETS STILL WEDNESDAY
Sheriff Priddy is still on the job.  He and Messers. W?. Lyle and Frank Hailey captured a 50-gallon still near Briery church yesterday and destroyed 300 gallons of mash.  They also captured three white men at the still, Charles Adams, Sanford Adams, and Durrette Richardson.  The still had not been put into operation, although a run was about ready to be made.  All the men captured were North Carolinians.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, December 24, 1925
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

SHERIFF PRIDDY IS DUE THE CREDIT
It is hard for us to understand why Prohibition Officer J.T. Chaney, when giving out reports of raids, etc. always takes all the credit. The raid Saturday night of a gambling party near Aspen, was due entirely to Sheriff Priddy, and Mr. Chaney was asked to take part, but in giving the report to The Times-Dispatch correspondent, Mr. Chaney seems to take all the credit.
The following is what was sent in by the South Boston correspondent to The Times-Dispatch:
South Boston, Va., Dec. 20 - Prohibition Officer J.T. Chaney and his squad made a haul in Charlotte County Saturday night, when they arrested eleven white men and one woman engaged in a poker game. The officers recovered $112 in cash, $65 in poker chips, five gallons of corn whiskey and an automobile.
All were taken into custody except one man, who made his escape.  The money, whiskey and automobile will be confiscated, while those arrested will answer at the next term of court.
Mr. Chaney is an alert officer, but why should he take all the credit?


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, 1925
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

HALIFAX FARMER KILLED FOLLOWING ROW
W.D. McKinney ????? charged With Slaying R.C. Hancock.  Dead Man Accused Assailant Of Reporting Him in Tobacco Sale, Alleged.
South Boston, Va., Nov. 16.  - R. Carter Hancock a prominent farmer of Halifax County, ten miles from Scottsburg was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon by Walter D. McKinney, also a farmer of the same neighborhood.
McBinney (McKinney) is in jail at Halifax Courthouse, charged with the murder.  According to Deputy Sheriff John W. Hatcher of Scottsburg, who arrested McKinney this morning, the shooting grew out of a row in which Hancock is alleged to have accused McKinney of reporting him to the Tobacco Growers' Association for selling tobacco on the open floor.
Hancock went to the home of McKinney, presumably on a visit, and it was there that the shooting occurred.  It is further alleged that McKinney ordered Hancock to leave his place and that Hancock became very abusive and refused to obey, where upon McKinney seized his shotgun and fired a load of shot directly into the heart of Hancock, who fell dead on the floor.
The only eyewitness to the shooting was W.S. Hancock's 10-year-old son, who was seated beside him when the fatal shot was fired.
Deputy Sheriff Hatcher and a coroner's jury viewed the body and adjourned the inquest until late this afternoon.
McKinney will be given a preliminary hearing at the courthouse on Thursday and will probably be tried at the November term of the Halifax County Circuit Court.
Hancock was one of the best known and well-to-do farmers of Halifax County.  He leaves a widow and seven children.  The burial will take place at Scottsburg tomorrow.


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, October 1, 1925
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

MEANEST OF ALL
About the meanest thing we have heard of in years is the strewing of roofing nails along the road leading from Drakes Branch to Wallace's Store.  Several motorists here had their automobile tires punctured recently on the road.
Mr. J.H. Ayers' Ford truck had all four of its tires punctured last Sunday evening, and one of the tires had nine of the nails, or tacks, in it.  We understand that Mr. D.R. Doss, Jr. recently, after returning from a trip on this road, took 29 nails out of one of his auto tires.
Now, can you imagine anyone being such a degenerate as to deliberately damage the property of another?


Source:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, February 11, 1926
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

SHERIFF PRIDDY SITLL (STILL) AFTER THE VIOLATOR
On Friday, January 29th, Sheriff Priddy, accompanied by Professor M. B. Bull and C.P. Robey, captured a large copper still in the Wylliesburg section.  Two thousand gallons of mash were poured out, no men were captured. When they were approaching the still, unknown to them, they disturbed a dog, which warned the men at the still; and when Sheriff Priddy, who went to the scene at the still, they found two overcoats and a fire that had just been made.
On Wednesday, February 3rd, Mr. C.P. Murphy, of Chatham, Automobile Inspector, came across a car with two white men near Keysville, out of gas, with 1925 license.  Becoming suspicious, he looked in the car and saw a keg a whiskey.  The inspector arrested the two men, Carson Hubbard and Waddell, and notified Sheriff Priddy, who wen (went) to the scene and found 13 gallons of what Sheriff Priddy says, is the best corn liquor he has smelled in ten years.  The men were tried and Waddell was released on $300.00 cash bail.  Hubbard's bond was fixed at $500.00.  We are not informed whether Hubbard made the bond or not.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, January 9, 1964
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

Area Police Still Seeking Clues In Slaying of Dr. Thomas Watkins
State, local and county police are still seeking the person who murdered Dr. Thomas Watkins at his home here December 18.  Numerous persons have been questioned, but still no arrests have been reported.
Police are investigating a possible link between the armed robbery of Dickerson's Store at Abilene and the slaying of Dr. Watkins.
Dickerson's Store was robbed on a Wednesday, Dec. 18, Dr. Watkins was killed in an armed robbery about 6:00 p.m.
Armed robberies in Prince Edward and Charlotte had not occurred for several years, and the fact that two happened in such a short period of time made the police investigators suspicious.
Both crimes were "daring" type assaults, and the net gain in both was small, about $25 at Abilene and an estimated $100 from Dr. Watkins.
The gunman in the Abilene holdup was a Negro male of slender build.  He was seen by several witnesses and is described as being between 20-30 year (years) of age, light brown complexion, and about five feet eight inches tall.  His weapon was a similar description.
Dr. Watkins' assailant was not seen well enough to be positively identified.
Whether or not there is a definite link in the two cases still remains to be determined.  State and county police in both Prince Edward and Charlotte are working on the case.  They ask anyone who might have any information to let them know.
The town of Drakes Branch and Charlotte County are jointly offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to arrest and conviction to Dr. Watkins' killer.

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Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, January 30, 1964
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

Police Have Artist's Sketch Made Of Suspect In Slaying Case And Robbery
State police artists have prepared a sketch of a slender Negro male being sought for the December 4 armed robbery of a store near Abilene. Police also have a theory that the same person who committed the robbery at Abilene, also murdered Dr. Thomas Watkins in the backyard of his home here on December 18.
State Police Investigator R.P. Rainey, Jr. said this is one of the many leads being checked out by investigators.
From information given by witnesses in the Prince Edward holdup, the Negro man was described as of "gingercake" complexion, between the ages of 20 and 30, with a height between five-feet six inches and six-foot. He escaped from the Abilene store with about $32 in bills and coins.  The sketch is a composite made from descriptions given police by the witnesses.
(Note: At press time we were unable to get a picture of the drawing for this week's issue of the Gazette, but hope to have it in next week's issue.)
Police has pointed out circumstances and facts leading to the possibility that the Abilene robber may have also killed Dr. Watkins.
Robbery was the apparent motive in the slaying of the 80-year-old Drakes Branch physician.  His wallet, believed to contain over $100, was taken by the assailant.
The robberies, each at pistol point, took place within two weeks time and in each instance on a Wednesday.  Moreover, police said, armed robberies had not previously occurred within the two counties for about four years.

Wielded Pistol
At Dickerson's store in Abilene, the man wielded a pistol and told the two proprietors he would "blow their brains out" if they didn't do what he commanded.
He brought with him a five-gallon gasoline container on the pretense his automobile had run out of gas.  He left the can behind in his haste.
There were no witnesses to the slaying of Dr. Watkins.  His sister, Miss Mary Bailey Watkins, caught a glimpse of the fleeing man but was unable to furnish a full description.
A man fitting the Abilene suspect's description had been seen in Drakes Branch, some 15 miles away, in November before either the armed robbery or the robbery slaying had occurred. 
Drakes Branch and Charlotte county governments are jointly offering a $1,00 reward for information leading to arrest and conviction of the person who killed Dr. Watkins.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, July 10, 1873
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

A colored boy named Jack Collins from Drakes Branch was arrested yesterday for stealing and selling a hat belonging to W.O. Thomas, who is employed in this office, from the hall of the Eagle Hotel.
On examination before Justice Moore, he was sent to jail for five days.  He has been lounging about the village for some days.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, May 15, 1873
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

Lorenzo Dow, (colored) was arrested and sent on to the County Court, under a warrant for bastardy, by Justice Moore, last Saturday.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Drakes Branch, VA., Thursday, August 20, 1925
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

SHERIFF PRIDDY AND DEPUTIES GET 185 GALLONS
Find 80 Gallons August 16; 105 Gallons August 14--Destroy Two Stills--No Men Captured.
The whiskey makers are receiving some very hard blows at the hands of sheriff Priddy just now.  In a week's time he and his deputies destroyed two stills, one copper of 75 gallon capacity.  At latter still was found 50 gallons of mash, but no liquor.  No men were captured but a fire was burning under the galvanized still.
The first find of liquor was made on August 16, when sheriff Priddy, C.P. Robey and S.A. Jackson, searched the woods where several weeks previous they had destroyed a large still and a quantity of liquor.  Not being satisfied with the amount of liquor found, the Sheriff went back, accompanied by his deputies, Messrs. Robey and Jackson, and found 80 gallons in five gallon glass jugs.  Still not being satisfied, he sent for State Prohibition Agent Chaney, of South Boston, and his "purity squad", and the Sheriff, accompanied by Deputies Robey and Jackson and L.H. Lindsey, and after many hours' search, found 105 gallons more, a new 75 gallon copper still, 120 empty sugar bags.
The above captures were made on the old Grigsby place, betweent (between) Charlotte Couthouse and Abilene.
On the 13th Sheriff Priddy and Deputies Robey and Jackson, captured a 50 gallon galvanized still on the old Osborne place, betweent (between) Drakes Branch and Keysville.  This still was in operation with the fires going, but no captures were made.
So you see the crops are not the only things that are suffering from the drought in Charlotte County.


Newspaper:  The Charlotte Gazette, Charlotte Court House, VA., Thursday, November 2, 1893
Submitted By:  Bea Adams King

Justice's Court
On Thursday last a warrant was sworn ???? by J.E. Crutcher, constable for Bacon ???? charging A.W.C. Redmond with threatening him with "white capping."  Dep. Sheriff Dickerson arrested Redmond, and brought him before Justice Tucker at Drakes Branch, who sent him on to the Grand Jury, with bail at $200.  Subsequently the two parties in talking over the matter found that they had been misled by ???? bearing negroes, and the matter was adjusted on Friday by Redmond paying the costs, having been kept over night at Drakes by Sheriff Dickerson.